clock menu more-arrow no yes

Who do Americans blame for White House chaos? Trump.

The White House Mark Wilson / Getty Images

New poll results show that Americans aren’t pleased with the way things are going in the chaotic White House.

According to a survey from the Huffington Post and YouGov, 37 percent of Americans think the White House is creating problems for itself, whereas 14 percent think the White House is solving problems.

What’s more, 41 percent of those polled say Trump’s administration is largely creating problems for the entire country, while just 19 percent think the White House is solving them.

YouGov/HuffPost

The poll — taken from July 31 to August 2, right after former communications director Anthony Scaramucci was discharged from the position — also measured confidence in terms of White House resignations. The survey found that a majority of Americans (52 percent total; 70 percent of Democrats; 48 percent of independents; 37 percent of Republicans) believe this administration is seeing a higher number of resignations compared to a typical presidential administration.

Since Trump took office, six people have resigned or were fired from their positions in the White House: National Security Adviser Michael Flynn, FBI Director James Comey, Communications Director Michael Dubke, press secretary Sean Spicer, Communications Director 2.0 Anthony Scaramucci, and Chief of Staff Reince Priebus. Of course others have fled (or were removed) from non-White House roles in the administration, including National Security Council Middle East adviser Derek Harvey, Director of the Office of Government Ethics Walter Shaub, and Acting Attorney General Sally Yates.

Though Americans largely believe that this administration has seen more resignations, PolitiFact found that the turnover rate in the Trump White House is not entirely unprecedented. They report that Priebus was the shortest-serving chief of staff in history, for example — he made it 189 days. His tenure came close to the staffer with the second-shortest term, Kenneth Duberstein, who served under Ronald Reagan, only lasted 203 days.

The exit race was even closer for comms directors. Scaramucci lasted a mere 10 days — three days longer than Reagan appointee Jack Koehler, who stepped down after a week when it was discovered that he once belonged to a Nazi youth group.

What’s more, a majority of respondents believe that the president is at fault for this high turnover rate. The survey reports that 71 percent of Americans think Trump bears "A lot of responsibility" for these successive resignations — almost no one, across parties, believes Trump deserves "no responsibility at all.”