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Recode Daily: Spotify is reporting Apple’s alleged anticompetitive behavior to the EU

Plus: Jack Dorsey decides to chat with an anti-vaxxer, ICE’s newly revealed massive database of license plates, and uncovered founder drama at Google.

Spotify CEO Daniel Ek.
Spotify CEO Daniel Ek.
Asa Mathat

Spotify stepped up its longstanding beef with Apple over Apple’s alleged anticompetitive behavior. The Swedish-based company announced it filed a formal complaint against Apple on Wednesday with EU regulators. Spotify finds fault with Apple for charging what it’s calling a discriminatory tax — a 30 percent fee on Spotify subscriptions sold in the Apple app store, that it says is designed to stifle competition for its own streaming music service, Apple Music. Spotify also launched a media campaign calling on the iPhone maker to “play fair.” The move comes just before Apple is set to launch a new subscription media service that some speculate may include music. Spotify’s complaint also comes at a time when there’s been more discussion about tech antitrust, such as US Senator Elizabeth Warren’s call to separate Apple from the app store. [Peter Kafka / Recode]

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Twitter CEO Jack Dorsey appeared on a podcast hosted by an anti-vaxxer. At a time when other social media companies are trying to limit verifiably false anti-vaccination content on their platforms, Dorsey decided to to join self-proclaimed health expert — and occasional anti-vaxx conspiracy peddler — Ben Greenfield on his show. Greenfield publicly promoted anti-vaccination content as recently as a month ago, tweeting that vaccinations “do indeed cause autism” — a statement that is disputed by the world’s leading health organizations. Greenfield also told his followers not to trust respected fact-checking website Snopes on the matter. According to a spokesperson from Twitter, Dorsey was not aware of Greenfield’s opinions about vaccines and they did not discuss it in his recent podcast. [Kurt Wagner / Recode]

ICE can access a private database of hundreds of millions of license plates, according to documents obtained by the ACLU. The civil liberties organization has called the database part of the agency’s “deportation machine” — one that can track the movements of vehicles all across the country. Over 9,200 ICE employees can access the database, run by the company Vigilant Solutions, which includes license plate scans from red-light and speed-limit cameras. Sen. Ron Wyden (D-OR) was quoted in the Washington Post saying, “a massive, for-profit location tracking database is about the worst idea I have ever heard of when it comes to Americans’ privacy and security.” [Drew Harwell and Tony Romm / Washington Post]

Google co-founder Larry Page had tension with the company board over retaining control of the company, according to documents revealed in a new lawsuit. The documents reveal Page’s concerns that his fellow co-founders Sergey Brin and former CEO Eric Schmidt would sell their special founder shares, reducing their joint majority control of the board. According to emails, Page made what was considered a “veiled threat” that he would block large acquisitions that could reduce his voting power. Page and Brin still hold majority voting control of the board, which has come into question in light of a perceived lack of oversight over sexual harassment scandals at Google by top executives who received payout packages even after being accused of misconduct. [Mark Bergen, Gerrit De Vynck, and Jef Feeley / Bloomberg News]

Top stories from Recode

Kathy Griffin says Twitter CEO Jack Dorsey should resign and she wouldn’t let Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg into her house. Listen to the Recode Decode podcast or read the transcript of the full conversation between Kara Swisher and the comedian. [Kara Swisher]

In HBO’s Theranos documentary “The Inventor,” director Alex Gibney says Elizabeth Holmes was fooled by her own lies. Gibney spoke with Recode’s Peter Kafka on the latest episode of Recode Media. [Peter Kafka]

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This article originally appeared on Recode.net.

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