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Recode Daily: Apple announces a special showbiz-themed event

Plus: another twist from Tesla, Sam Altman’s latest project, and a new lawsuit about Google’s payout to a former exec facing sexual harassment allegations.

Silhouetted figures under an Apple logo. Drew Angerer/Getty Images

Apple announced it’s hosting a special event at its California headquarters later this month. The company is expected to announce the details about its new TV streaming and news subscription services — sending showbiz-themed invites for the March 25th event. It’s been reported that the company has made video content deals with stars like Oprah, Jennifer Aniston, Reese Witherspoon, and Steve Carell. Apple has had a tougher time pitching major newspapers like the New York Times and Washington Post to give up a 50 percent revenue cut to join in on a relaunch of its streaming news and magazine service. [Zac Hall / 9to5mac]

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The US Government is rushing to implement facial recognition software at major airports. President Trump issued an executive order last year mandating that facial recognition identification software be used on all international travelers at the top 20 US airports by 2021. According to a new report from BuzzFeed News, the US Department of Homeland Security is now “rushing to get those systems up and running at airports across the country” and implementing these new technologies “in the absence of proper vetting, regulatory safeguards, and what some privacy advocates argue is in defiance of the law.” The report analyzed 346 pages of documents from the nonprofit research organization, Electronic Privacy Information Center. [Davey Alba / BuzzFeed News]

Actually, Tesla will not close all its stores, wrote CEO Elon Musk in an email to his employees Sunday night. Last month, the company made waves when it announced it would shut its brick-and-mortar stores in favor of online sales only. But now, the company plans to instead keep some stores open and raise prices by about 3 percent on most of its vehicles in order to make up for cost. “All things considered, this seems like a reasonable compromise between current and future customers,” wrote Musk in his memo. [Lora Kolodny / CNBC]

Sam Altman introduced a new “capped profit” model for startups trying to balance ethics and making money. Altman, who recently stepped down from his role as president of Y Combinator, is starting a for-profit company called OpenAI LP that plans to raise billions but will limit the amount investors can profit from their money (well, only up to 100 times what they initially put in). In an interview with Recode, Altman calls his new company, complete with a mission-driven nonprofit charter, “a way to balance capitalism and sharing benefits.” The larger goal, as Teddy Schleifer writes, is to help create an artificial intelligence that “isn’t just another asset for a profit-seeking company.” [Theodore Schleifer / Recode]

A new lawsuit claims that Alphabet CEO Larry Page mishandled awarding a $150 million stock grant to a former exec who was accused of sexual harassment. The lawsuit alleges that Page didn’t get a board thumbs-up to compensate Andy Rubin, the Android mobile creator, and only sought a retroactive “rubber stamp” approval. The charges in the case “could add fuel to criticism that the company’s board isn’t strong enough to keep management accountable to shareholders.” [Joel Rosenblatt and Gerrit De Vynck / Bloomberg]

Top stories from Recode

Psychologists explain why at-home exercise machines like Peloton have what it takes to keep people moving. Here’s how these companies use social media, gamification, and VR to “give these exercise tools more staying power.” [Rani Molla]

This is cool

Inside tech’s search for an architectural legacy.

Here’s one for all you Game of Thrones nerds.

This article originally appeared on Recode.net.

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