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Recode Daily: Facebook’s massive reorg keeps user privacy and security top of mind

Plus, now we know who’s taking charge at WhatsApp; Comcast prepares an all-cash bid to gate-crash Disney’s Fox deal; and why life gets better after 50.

Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg
Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg
Josh Edelson / AFP / Getty Images

Facebook is making the biggest executive shuffle in its 15-year history. WhatsApp, Messenger and Facebook’s core app are getting new leaders as part of a massive executive reorg. CEO Mark Zuckerberg has reorganized the social giant’s product and engineering organizations into three main divisions, including a new “Family of apps” group run by Chief Product Officer Chris Cox, the executive previously in charge of the core Facebook app. Cox will now oversee Facebook, Instagram, WhatsApp and Messenger, four social apps with a combined reach of more than five billion monthly users. A “New platforms and infra” group will be managed by CTO Mike Schroepfer, and will include a team dedicated to blockchain tech, along with Facebook’s AI, VR and AR efforts. A third division called “Central product services,” headed by Javier Olivan, includes all the shared features that operate across multiple products or apps, such as ads, security and growth. [Kurt Wagner / Recode]

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Facebook is also creating a new team focused on building privacy products. And Chris Daniels was named the new VP of Facebook-owned WhatsApp, just a week after its co-founder and CEO Jan Koum announced he was leaving. [Kurt Wagner / Recode]

Amazon employees are outraged by the company’s opposition to a plan to formally consider women and minority candidates when selecting new board members. Tensions surfaced last week on an employee email thread following a proposal by shareholders that Facebook implement a “Rooney Rule,” akin to the rule that requires NFL teams to interview at least one minority candidate for head coaching and general manager openings. All 10 directors of Amazon’s board are white; seven are men and three are women. [Jason Del Rey / Recode]

Comcast is preparing to bid for the media assets that 21st Century Fox already agreed to sell to Disney. But Comcast CEO Brian Roberts, who first bid for Fox assets last fall, won’t make a new move unless a federal judge approves AT&T’s plan to buy Time Warner; a decision in that case is due by June 12. Meanwhile, 21st Century Fox CEO James Murdoch is clarifiying his post-merger plans: He wants to become a VC. [Greg Roumeliotis and Liana B. Baker / Reuters]

Workplace messaging company Slack has eight million daily users and three million paid users. CEO Stewart Butterfield said that annual revenue is about $300 million; he said the company’s planned IPO will not happen this year. [Rolfe Winkler / The Wall Street Journal]

Here’s a darkly comic look inside Univision, written by some of its employees, who argue that the company has been in decline for years due to corporate raiding, complacency, excess and incompetence. [Kate Conger, David Uberti and Laura Wagner / Gizmodo]

Recode Presents ...

“Chaos Monkeys” author and former Facebook ad targeting manager Antonio García-Martínez will join Kara Swisher on this week’s Too Embarrassed to Ask podcast. Got questions for Antonio about Facebook or anything else? Send them in to TooEmbarrassed@recode.net or tweet them with #TooEmbarrassed!

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The happiness curve: Why life gets better after 50.

This article originally appeared on Recode.net.