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Rep. Adam Schiff and Sen. Mark Warner aren’t done demanding answers from tech on Russia’s election meddling

Schiff and Warner are No. 14 on the Recode 100.

For months, Facebook, Google and Twitter have squirmed as U.S. Congress highlighted how Russian agents had spread disinformation on their platforms during the 2016 presidential election.

At the heart of that scrutiny are two Democrats: Rep. Adam Schiff and Sen. Mark Warner. Their continued public prodding has left Silicon Valley no choice but to come to terms with its own business practices.

Schiff, from California, is the top Democrat on the House Intelligence Committee. Warner, a Virginian, is the top Democrat on the Senate’s intel panel. Both of their committees have devoted months to studying whether President Donald Trump and his 2016 campaign benefited in any way from Russian collusion.

In doing so, the two lawmakers have shed new light on the Kremlin’s troll army, known as the Internet Research Agency, and its efforts to sow social discord online. That includes Facebook, where Russian propaganda may have reached more than 120 million Americans, as the company revealed at hearings with Schiff and Warner in November.

Without their efforts, those details might not have become public. There may not have been a series of public congressional hearings into the matter in the first place. And Facebook, Google and Twitter certainly would not have announced major changes to the way they sell and identify political ads.

Still, the Democratic duo isn’t finished. Warner, for one, is pushing for new legislation. And both are still demanding more information about what transpired on tech platforms around Election Day — revelations that could send yet another shockwave through a Russia-ravaged Silicon Valley.

This article originally appeared on Recode.net.