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Recode Daily: Here’s the story behind VC Steve Jurvetson’s sudden fall from grace

Plus Jack Dorsey’s “other” company is worth more than Twitter, bidders for Rolling Stone and Weinberg Co., and Detroit is building its own internet.

DFJ Partner Steve Jurvetson speaks onstage during TechCrunch Disrupt SF 2017 at Pier 48 on September 18, 2017, in San Francisco, California.
DFJ partner Steve Jurvetson speaks onstage during TechCrunch Disrupt SF 2017 at Pier 48 on September 18, 2017, in San Francisco, Califo.
Steve Jennings / Getty Images

Here’s the story behind VC Steve Jurvetson’s sudden fall from grace. Jurvetson is the highest-profile VC to be ousted since women this year started to speak out about a range of abuse from male investors in Silicon Valley and beyond. He was recently pushed out of DFJ, the premier venture capital firm he co-founded, after an internal investigation found, in part, a pattern of dishonesty with women, including extramarital affairs that, in the eyes of some, crossed into the professional world. [Theodore Schleifer / Recode]

Two years after going public, Square — CEO Jack Dorsey’s “other” company — is worth more than Twitter. The mobile payments startup had a market value of $16.5 billion — more than a billion dollars above Twitter’s market cap. Meanwhile, after the recent controversy over “verifying” a white supremacist, Twitter’s new guidelines around violence and physical harm say users can lose verified status for bad behavior both on and off the service. [Rani Molla /Recode]

A handful of bidders are circling Rolling Stone, which was recently put up for sale by founder Jann Wenner, who has run it for 50 years. In the mix are trade publisher Jay Penske, Bustle CEO Bryan Goldberg and music exec Irving Azoff. And a surprise bidder has emerged for the rudderless Weinstein Co. Maria Contreras-Sweet, who led the Small Business Administration under President Obama, is proposing a majority-female board of directors there, and attorney Gloria Allred is on board with the plan. [Peter Kafka / Recode]

Meet Amazon’s nearly invisible workforce of “last-mile” delivery workers, self-employed plainclothes contractors who drive their own cars and compete for shifts on the company’s Uber-like app platform called Amazon Flex. Here’s how it works — and what the mass-contractor model is like for the driver when it doesn’t. [Bryan Menegus / Gizmodo]

Charles Manson, one of the most famous killers of the 20th century, is dead at 83. Manson was convicted of leading his ‘family ‘ to commit nine murders in the late 1960s. Since then, the group ‘has occupied a dark, persistent place in American culture — and American commerce. It has inspired, among other things, pop songs, an opera, films, a host of internet fan sites, T-shirts, children’s wear and half the stage name of the rock musician Marilyn Manson." [Margalit Fox / New York Times]

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This article originally appeared on Recode.net.

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