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Minnesota governor: Philando Castile police shooting wouldn’t have happened if he were white

“I’m forced to confront, and I think all of us in Minnesota are forced to confront, this kind of racism exists.”

Minnesota Gov. Mark Dayton did not mince words at a Thursday press conference on the police shooting of Philando Castile: “Would this have happened if those passengers — the driver, the passenger — were white? I don’t think it would have. So I’m forced to confront, and I think all of us in Minnesota are forced to confront, this kind of racism exists.”

The governor’s comments get to the exact sentiment a lot of people are feeling today: There are big racial disparities in America’s criminal justice system.

The data backs this up. An analysis of the available FBI data by Vox’s Dara Lind found that US police kill black people at disproportionate rates: Black people accounted for 31 percent of police killing victims in 2012, even though they made up just 13 percent of the US population. Although the data is incomplete because it’s based on voluntary reports from police agencies around the country, it highlights the vast disparities in how police use force.

police shooting by race Joe Posner/Vox

Black teens were 21 times as likely as white teens to be shot and killed by police between 2010 and 2012, according to a ProPublica analysis of the FBI data. ProPublica’s Ryan Gabrielson, Ryann Grochowski Jones, and Eric Sagara reported: “One way of appreciating that stark disparity, ProPublica’s analysis shows, is to calculate how many more whites over those three years would have had to have been killed for them to have been at equal risk. The number is jarring — 185, more than one per week.”

One possible explanation for the racial disparities: subconscious biases. Studies show that officers are quicker to shoot black suspects in video game simulations. Josh Correll, a University of Colorado Boulder psychology professor who conducted the research, said it’s possible the bias could lead to even more skewed outcomes in the field. “In the very situation in which [officers] most need their training,” he said, “we have some reason to believe that their training will be most likely to fail them.”

Part of the solution to this type of bias is better training that helps cops acknowledge and deal with their potential subconscious prejudices. But critics also argue that more accountability could help deter future brutality or excessive use of force, since it would make it clear that there are consequences to the misuse and abuse of police powers. Yet right now, lax legal standards make it difficult to legally punish individual police officers for use of force, even when it might be excessive.


Watch: Why recording the police is so important

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