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9 of the most egregious lies and inaccuracies in Donald Trump’s foreign policy speech

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Donald Trump has lied in debates, sent threatening tweets, misled interviewers, and circulated outrageous personal and political conspiracy theories throughout his presidential campaign.

On Monday, Trump made clear that his habit of getting the facts wrong wasn’t limited to the rough-and-tumble nature of a primary campaign: He made repeated, clearly false assertions throughout a high-profile speech about the Orlando shooting, a major domestic crisis. The speech was read from a teleprompter and presumably written over several hours and, one would imagine, with the help of Trump’s staff.

"The mouth moves and the lies pour forth," wrote the New Yorker’s David Remnick in a story published Monday morning about Trump’s response to the shooting. And that was before Trump’s speech in the afternoon.

Here are 9 of the most egregious things Trump got wrong in the speech.

1) Trump: There’s no screening for refugees coming to the US

We're not screening people. So why don't we have an effective screening system? We don't. We're being laughed at all over the world. The burden is on Hillary Clinton to tell us why we should admit anyone into our country who supports violence of any kind against gay and lesbian Americans.

The truth: Trump is wrong: There is an extensive, onerous screening process for refugees who come to America. You can see so yourself here.

2) Trump criticizes Libya intervention, supported it himself

For instance, the last major NATO mission was Hillary Clinton's war in Libya. That mission helped unleash ISIS on a new continent.

The truth: Trump has repeatedly characterized Libya as a unique failure of President Obama and Hillary Clinton’s foreign policy. But he actively supported that intervention, even though he's spent much of his candidacy pretending he didn't.

3) Trump: Clinton wants to admit "hundreds of thousands" of refugees to the US

Altogether under the Clinton plan, you'd be admitting hundreds of thousands of refugees from the Middle East with no system to prevent radicalization of the children and their children.

The truth: Trump is wrong here as well: Clinton has only called for increasing the number of Syrian refugees by 65,000, according to CNN.

4) Trump: The Orlando shooter was "born this Afghan"

The killer, whose name I will not use or ever say was born this Afghan, of Afghan parents, who emigrated to the United States.

The truth: Trump is wrong: Omar Saddiqui Mateen, the killer, was born in New York and raised in Florida.

5) Trump: "Large numbers" of Somali refugees joining ISIS

Large numbers of Somali refugees have tried to join ISIS. The male shooter in San Bernardino, again whose name I will not mention, was the child of immigrants from Pakistan and he brought his wife.

The truth: This dramatically misrepresents the number of Somali refugees from the US who have joined ISIS, which a New York Times story pegs at no more than 15. Perhaps Trump is speaking about Somali refugees globally, but given when he made this point — during a part of his speech about domestic terrorism — that’s almost certainly giving him too much credit.

6) Trump: Obama’s "famous apology tour" created ISIS

We've tried it President Obama's way. Doesn't work. He gave the world his apology tour. We got ISIS. And many other problems in return. That's what we got. Remember the famous apology tour

The truth: There is a coherent conservative critique of President Obama's speeches abroad, in which he has at times acknowledged America's faults in foreign wars. And there is a coherent conservative critique of President Obama's approach to defeating ISIS.

But Trump isn't engaging with either narrative. He's instead just drawing a direct link from Obama "apology tour" to the birth of ISIS, and I'm not aware of any serious attempt to connect the two. Trump certainly doesn't give any reason to believe they're related.

Even if you look at the supposed apologies that have to do with Islamic terrorism or the Muslim world, it’s not clear how they could have possibly created ISIS.

7) Trump: Hillary Clinton wants to ban guns

[Hillary Clinton] says the solution is to ban guns. ... She wants to take away Americans' guns and then admit the very people who want to slaughter us. Let them come into the country. We don't have guns. ...

She wants to take away Americans' guns and then admit the very people who want to slaughter us. Let them come into the country. We don't have guns. Let them come in, let them have all the fun they want.

The truth: Clinton has not called for anything remotely resembling a ban on guns — she wants to ban assault weapons but has otherwise not called for a gun ban. Someone listening to Trump's speech would have come away with an entirely wrong idea of her policy.

8) Trump’s criticism on pushing for regime change in Syria

The decision to overthrow the regime in Libya, then pushing for the overthrow of the regime in Syria, among other things, without plans for the day after, have created space for ISIS to expand and grow.

The truth: As with his initial approval of the Libya invasion, Trump has grossly distorted his record on Syria. (As Vox’s Matt Yglesias points out, he once called for a "big, beautiful safe zone" in the country.)

The weirder, specific problem here is the knock on Clinton and Obama for creating ISIS by "pushing for the overthrow of the regime in Syria" — when Trump has himself called for ground troops in Syria.

9) Trump suggests Muslims need to do more to help fight terrorism

They have to work with us. They know what is going on. They know that he was bad. They knew the people in San Bernardino were bad. But you know, what they didn't turn them in and we had death.

The truth: This line revives a long-running Trump suggestion that Muslims are largely to blame for not really joining us in the fight against terrorism.

As Vox’s Zack Beauchamp has noted, this is "bullshit."

"The statistics are clear," Beauchamp wrote in March. "In the US, Muslim communities have been extraordinarily forthcoming with the police in terrorism cases."


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