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BlackBerry CEO John Chen to Talk Phones, Cars and More at October's Code/Mobile

While much is made of the company's struggles in the phone business, a good deal of the company's fate depends on its moves into other areas, including the connected car.

Asa Mathat

When BlackBerry bought QNX back in 2010, it was looking to replace its aging phone operating system with a more modern core.

Bringing QNX to phones ended up taking longer than expected and failed to generate much enthusiasm when it did arrive.

But the purchase also gave the company access to a world of devices beyond the phone and tablet, including a significant presence in the connected car. QNX is powering systems used inside more than 60 million vehicles.

At Code/Mobile in October, BlackBerry CEO John Chen will talk about how BlackBerry is doing in the automotive and other new markets, as well as update progress on other fronts, including the effort to turn around the company’s handset business.

A veteran of our stage, Chen appeared at our 2014 Code Conference, where he acknowledged that his task had been tougher than he had expected but said prospects for the company were improving.

Since then, BlackBerry has grown its software business to have that part of the company generate $500 million in revenue this year but has seen its share of the phone market dip further. Chen said last month that he believes there remains an opportunity for a profitable handset business. However, he added that his tolerance for losing money there is running thin.

Chen joins a lineup that includes Android founder Andy Rubin, AT&T Mobility chief Glenn Lurie, Ericsson CEO Hans Vestberg as well as top executives from Google, Facebook and Twitter — to name just a few.

The event takes place Oct. 7-8 at the beautiful Ritz-Carlton in Half Moon Bay, Calif.

If you want to be in the audience for Code/Mobile, you still have that opportunity — but not for long. Remaining tickets for the event are available on a first-come, first-served basis here.

This article originally appeared on Recode.net.