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NASA Says Liquid Water Flows on Mars, Has Some Pretty Neat Pictures to Prove It

New pictures show that briny water flows during the planet's warmer seasons.

NASA

NASA researchers have long suspected that there’s liquid water on Mars, and now they have definitive evidence: Images from the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter confirm that water does indeed flow on the Red Planet.

The images supplied by NASA, which you can gawk at below, are 3-D models that highlight the presence of water. The agency says the visible dark streaks are “recurring slope lineae,” proof that briny water flows on Mars during the warmer seasons (a summer day can get up to 70 degrees Fahrenheit, but the average temperature is about -80 degrees).

Of course, one big reason people are as excited as they are about finding water on Mars is that it indicates a greater chance for discovering extraterrestrial life in and around our solar system. For your viewing pleasure, check out the pictures below, and head over to the NASA website if you want to see more:

 Those dark streaks? They’re formed by liquid water.
Those dark streaks? They’re formed by liquid water.
NASA

 More dark streaks on the walls of the Garni Crater.
More dark streaks on the walls of the Garni Crater.
NASA

And here is an animation of water flowing in the Hale Crater on Mars:

This article originally appeared on Recode.net.