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U.K. Bill Would Force ISPs to Store Citizens' Internet History for a Year

This level of online monitoring has been banned in the U.S., Canada and every other European nation.

Oli Scarff / Getty Images

British politicians would dramatically expand the U.K.’s powers of mass surveillance under a draft bill demanding that ISPs store records of every website visited by internet users for up to a year.

This level of online monitoring has been banned in the U.S., Canada and every other European nation, and has even previously been rejected in the U.K. Supporters of the legislation (known as the Investigatory Powers Bill) are presenting it and other security measures as a compromise, but privacy campaigners say it is in fact more intrusive.

Records of citizens’ Internet activity would only include the basic URL of websites they visit and not any specific pages. Searches made on sites would not be recorded, but the time of visits, as well as the IP addresses of other computers which the individual contacted, would.

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This article originally appeared on Recode.net.