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Cards Against Humanity Sells Nothing on Black Friday, Makes $71,000, Spends It Immediately

It's the third annual anti-Black Friday stunt from the card game company.

Eric Johnson for Re/code

Nothing is less popular than bullshit.

That’s not an observation on life. Rather, it’s a literal interpretation of what happened yesterday when the popular politically-incorrect card game Cards Against Humanity “sold nothing” for Black Friday, for $5. And all day, you could not buy anything else from their online store; the only thing you could do was put in your credit card information, click a button and lose $5, before the site asked for another $5.

This was pretty popular. The stunt ultimately raised $71,145 from 11,248 buyers as of midnight EST on Friday, which is pretty good!

But it’s not as good as last year’s Black Friday, when the Chicago-based game company sold boxes of literal bull feces for six bucks. About 30,000 people wound up buying them, for a total of $180,000 in sales. For poop.

Cards Against Humanity co-creator Max Temkin pointed out, though, that selling nothing also means not having to have inventory.

“Last year we sold $180k of bullshit, but none of it was profit,” Temkin said in an email to Re/code Friday evening, shortly after the sale crossed $61,000. “It was totally at cost. This year we get to keep the whole $61k!”

I assumed that was a joke at first. After all, the profits from the 2014 anti-Black Friday campaign, the one that mailed people bovine turds, were donated to a charity called Heifer International that provides livestock to developing communities.

https://twitter.com/MaxTemkin/status/670505342426611712

But, no, they kept the money — briefly. Temkin followed up late Friday with an itemized list of everything he and his 16 his 17 colleagues would spend the money on, which included everything from TVs to expensive scotch to divorce attorney fees to vacations to charitable donations.

You can read the full list of what they bought here.

This article originally appeared on Recode.net.

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