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ESPN anchor Stuart Scott has died. Watch his inspiring speech on battling cancer.

LOS ANGELES, CA - JULY 16:  TV personality Stuart Scott accepts the 2014 Jimmy V Perseverance Award onstage during the 2014 ESPYS at Nokia Theatre L.A. Live on July 16, 2014 in Los Angeles, California.  (Photo by Kevin Winter/Getty Images)
LOS ANGELES, CA - JULY 16: TV personality Stuart Scott accepts the 2014 Jimmy V Perseverance Award onstage during the 2014 ESPYS at Nokia Theatre L.A. Live on July 16, 2014 in Los Angeles, California. (Photo by Kevin Winter/Getty Images)
Kevin Winter/Getty Images

ESPN anchor Scott Stuart, one of the network's signature anchors, died Sunday morning after a lengthy battle with cancer.

Stuart has been known, professionally, for his announcing and catchphrases. But more recently, he had begun to publicly discuss his disease and treatment. In July, he delivered an especially inspiring speech at the ESPY awards:

"When you die, it does not mean that you lose to cancer," Scott tells the audience. "You beat cancer by how you live, why you live, and in the manner in which you live."

"So live, live, fight like hell. And when you get too tired to fight, then lay down and rest and let somebody else fight for you. That's also very, very important. I can't do this 'don't give up thing' all by myself. I have thousands of people on Twitter and on the streets who encourage me."

Scott discusses the support he has from others, and is frank about the difficulties of battling cancer.

"I just got out of the hospital, this past Friday," Scott says, speaking in July. "Seven day stay. And I crashed. I had liver complications, I had kidney failure, I had four surgeries in the span of seven days. I had tubes and wires running in and out of every part of my body. Guys when I say every part of my body, every part of my body."

"As of Sunday, I didn't even know if I'd make it. I couldn't fight. But doctors and nurses could. People that I love, my friends and family, they could fight. My girlfriend, who slept on the very uncomfortable hospital cot by my side every night, she could fight. The people that I love did last week what they always do: they visited, they talked to me, they listened to me, they sat silent sometimes, they loved me."

Scott was 49.