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Gaza's Filter Bubbles, How the U.S. Scooped Glenn Greenwald's Intercept and More Morning #Mustreads

Closely examining the way people talk about the war in Gaza, through data, and how the government used the AP to beat a damaging story from the Intercept.

Gilad Lotan, Medium

Buongiorno!

Here are the links getting tossed around the Re/code newsroom this morning:

  1. Betaworks data scientist Gilad Lotan surveys the way the Gaza conflict is playing out on social media. Not surprisingly, he finds that on Twitter and Facebook, users discover views that fit with their own. Quite surprisingly, he finds anonymous gossip app Secret to be a place for level-headed conversation.
  2. According to a Huffington Post report, government officials reached out to Pulitzer Prize-winning AP reporter Eileen Sullivan with a story about the ballooning size of the terrorism watch list. One problem: Glenn Greenwald’s Intercept had the scoop first from an undisclosed source.
  3. You might have heard about the New York hotel that threatened to fine newlyweds if their wedding resulted in any negative Yelp reviews for the venue. Well, Slate now has a whole mortifying exchange with one former guest of the place.
  4. A new trend threatens the sanctity of the bridges in our nation’s capitol: Apparently couples are attaching “love locks,” linked padlocks symbolizing undying love, to the railings of bridges in D.C. Check out the Washington Post’s story for more.
  5. Motherboard reports that the maker of the popular childhood toy “Buckyballs” (terrifying little magnets that end up in couch cushions, toddlers’ noses and other places they shouldn’t go) is going, excuse the term, balls to the wall to fight for the right to keep producing them.

If you see any stories you’d like to send our way (or have any questions/comments about stories we’ve recommended), feel free to shoot an email to noah.kulwin@recode.net.

This article originally appeared on Recode.net.