Everything you need to know about student debt

20 Cards

CURATED BY Libby Nelson

2014-06-08 17:43:09 -0400

  1. What is a student loan?
  2. How much student debt is out there?
  3. How much debt does the average student have?
  4. Why has student debt increased so much?
  5. 47 states spend less on college students than they did in 2008
  6. What kinds of student loans are there?
  7. How are federal student loan interest rates calculated?
  8. What colleges have the most student debt?
  9. What happens if you don’t pay back a student loan?
  10. How many people aren't paying back their student loans?
  11. Why can't student loans be discharged in bankruptcy?
  12. What is income-based student loan repayment?
  13. What effect does student debt have on the economy?
  14. Does the government make money on student loans?
  15. What's the case for student debt?
  16. What are some proposals for reducing student debt?
  17. You didn't answer my question!
  18. Where can I learn more about student debt?
  19. How have these cards changed?
  20. 10 colleges that leave parents with the most debt
  1. Card 1 of 20

    What is a student loan?

  2. Card 2 of 20

    How much student debt is out there?

  3. Card 3 of 20

    How much debt does the average student have?

  4. Card 4 of 20

    Why has student debt increased so much?

    The total amount of student debt in the US has more than tripled in the past 10 years, from $363 billion in 2005 to more than $1.2 trillion today. It's increasing for a few reasons: More students are going to college than they used to, a higher proportion are taking out loans, and they're borrowing more than students did in the past.

    Screen_shot_2014-04-08_at_12

    Lots of factors go into why tuition prices are rising much faster than inflation. But in short, students are paying a greater share of the costs at public universities than they used to because states are subsidizing public education less. Tuition prices are rising at private colleges and universities, too, for a variety of reasons.

    With more people attending colleges charging ever-higher tuition, the number of borrowers has increased 70 percent in 10 years. So has the amount that the average student borrows. In 2004, 23 million people had student loans, and the average balance was $15,651. By 2013, 39 million people had student loans, and the average balance was nearly $25,000.

  5. Card 5 of 20

    47 states spend less on college students than they did in 2008

  6. Card 6 of 20

    What kinds of student loans are there?

  7. Card 7 of 20

    How are federal student loan interest rates calculated?

  8. Card 8 of 20

    What colleges have the most student debt?

  9. Card 9 of 20

    What happens if you don’t pay back a student loan?

  10. Card 10 of 20

    How many people aren't paying back their student loans?

  11. Card 11 of 20

    Why can't student loans be discharged in bankruptcy?

  12. Card 12 of 20

    What is income-based student loan repayment?

  13. Card 13 of 20

    What effect does student debt have on the economy?

  14. Card 14 of 20

    Does the government make money on student loans?

  15. Card 15 of 20

    What's the case for student debt?

  16. Card 16 of 20

    What are some proposals for reducing student debt?

  17. Card 17 of 20

    You didn't answer my question!

  18. Card 18 of 20

    Where can I learn more about student debt?

  19. Card 19 of 20

    How have these cards changed?

  20. Card 20 of 20

    10 colleges that leave parents with the most debt

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