Everything you need to know about network neutrality

17 Cards

CURATED BY Timothy B. Lee

2014-05-21 14:53:57 -0400

  1. What is network neutrality?
  2. Who invented the concept of network neutrality?
  3. What’s the argument for network neutrality?
  4. Is regulation necessary to protect network neutrality?
  5. What's the case against network neutrality regulations?
  6. How did the government promote open networks in the Internet's early years?
  7. Is the Internet a big truck?
  8. What was the 2010 Open Internet Order?
  9. Why did an appeals court rule the FCC’s network neutrality rules illegal in 2014?
  10. What's the FCC's next move after its loss in court?
  11. Does Chairman Wheeler's new proposal mean the end of network neutrality?
  12. Has network neutrality been violated in the past?
  13. Netflix has been forced to cut private deals with ISPs. Is that undermining net neutrality?
  14. How does net neutrality apply to cellular networks?
  15. What are the alternatives to network neutrality regulation?
  16. You didn't answer my question!
  17. How have these cards changed?
  1. Card 1 of 17

    What is network neutrality?

  2. Card 2 of 17

    Who invented the concept of network neutrality?

  3. Card 3 of 17

    What’s the argument for network neutrality?

  4. Card 4 of 17

    Is regulation necessary to protect network neutrality?

  5. Card 5 of 17

    What's the case against network neutrality regulations?

  6. Card 6 of 17

    How did the government promote open networks in the Internet's early years?

  7. Card 7 of 17

    Is the Internet a big truck?

  8. Card 8 of 17

    What was the 2010 Open Internet Order?

  9. Card 9 of 17

    Why did an appeals court rule the FCC’s network neutrality rules illegal in 2014?

    When Congress overhauled telecommunications law in 1996, it created two new categories:

    • Telecommunications services are common-carrier services such as traditional phone service. The law gives the FCC broad discretion to regulate them.
    • Information services are any service that allows people to store, process, and publish information online. These services are exempt from most FCC regulations.

    In 1996, online services such as AOL and Compuserve would have been considered Information services. Today, that category would include most websites and Internet services.

    A gray area exists around how to classify residential broadband service. After the Supreme Court ruled that the FCC could choose either category for them in 2005, the Bush-era FCC classified them as "information services," a classification that shielded them from most regulation.

    Barack Obama's first pick to head the FCC, Julius Genachowski, faced a dilemma when he took office. If he reversed the Bush-era FCC and declared broadband a telecommunications service, he would have clear legal authority for network neutrality rules. But when he broached the possibility of doing this in 2010, he faced a backlash. Critics worried that re-classifying broadband  as a telecommunications service would lead to the return of other controversial regulations such as the line-sharing rules of the 1990s.

    So, in an effort to avoid controversy, Genachowski tried to split the difference. The FCC retained the "information service" category, but argued that certain provisions of the 1996 Telecommunications Act gave it authority to establish net neutrality rules for information services.

    After more than 3 years of litigation, the courts rejected this gambit. The DC Circuit Appeals Court ruled that the FCC's network neutrality rules amounted to common carrier regulations and the law doesn't allow information services to be regulated as common carriers. Hence, the FCC's network neutrality rules were illegal.

  10. Card 10 of 17

    What's the FCC's next move after its loss in court?

  11. Card 11 of 17

    Does Chairman Wheeler's new proposal mean the end of network neutrality?

  12. Card 12 of 17

    Has network neutrality been violated in the past?

  13. Card 13 of 17

    Netflix has been forced to cut private deals with ISPs. Is that undermining net neutrality?

  14. Card 14 of 17

    How does net neutrality apply to cellular networks?

  15. Card 15 of 17

    What are the alternatives to network neutrality regulation?

  16. Card 16 of 17

    You didn't answer my question!

  17. Card 17 of 17

    How have these cards changed?

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