Everything you need to know about network neutrality

17 Cards

CURATED BY Timothy B. Lee

2014-05-21 14:53:57 -0400

  1. What is network neutrality?
  2. Who invented the concept of network neutrality?
  3. What’s the argument for network neutrality?
  4. Is regulation necessary to protect network neutrality?
  5. What's the case against network neutrality regulations?
  6. How did the government promote open networks in the Internet's early years?
  7. Is the Internet a big truck?
  8. What was the 2010 Open Internet Order?
  9. Why did an appeals court rule the FCC’s network neutrality rules illegal in 2014?
  10. What's the FCC's next move after its loss in court?
  11. Does Chairman Wheeler's new proposal mean the end of network neutrality?
  12. Has network neutrality been violated in the past?
  13. Netflix has been forced to cut private deals with ISPs. Is that undermining net neutrality?
  14. How does net neutrality apply to cellular networks?
  15. What are the alternatives to network neutrality regulation?
  16. You didn't answer my question!
  17. How have these cards changed?
  1. Card 1 of 17

    What is network neutrality?

  2. Card 2 of 17

    Who invented the concept of network neutrality?

  3. Card 3 of 17

    What’s the argument for network neutrality?

  4. Card 4 of 17

    Is regulation necessary to protect network neutrality?

  5. Card 5 of 17

    What's the case against network neutrality regulations?

  6. Card 6 of 17

    How did the government promote open networks in the Internet's early years?

  7. Card 7 of 17

    Is the Internet a big truck?

  8. Card 8 of 17

    What was the 2010 Open Internet Order?

  9. Card 9 of 17

    Why did an appeals court rule the FCC’s network neutrality rules illegal in 2014?

  10. Card 10 of 17

    What's the FCC's next move after its loss in court?

    After the DC Circuit Court struck down the Federal Communications Commission's  Open Internet Order in January 2014, FCC chairman Tom Wheeler had to go back to the drawing board. Wheeler wanted regulations that would protect network neutrality, but the court decision limited his options.

    On April 23, the Wall Street Journal reported on Wheeler's next move. According to the Journal, Wheeler's new plan would prohibit internet service providers from blocking or discriminating against specific websites. But they would be allowed to set aside a special "fast lane." Content companies like Netflix and YouTube could pay extra to ensure that their content got enough bandwidth.

    The announcement was a disappointment for liberal groups such as Public Knowledge, which had hoped Chairman Wheeler would instead reclassify broadband as a telecommunications service. That change, based on the provisions of the 1996 Telecommunications Act, would have given the FCC the power to impose strong network neutrality regulations prohibiting such "fast lanes" for deep-pocketed content companies.

    "This is not net neutrality," said Michael Weinberg, vice president of Public Knowledge. "The FCC is inviting ISPs to pick winners and losers online. This standard allows ISPs to impose a new price of entry for innovation on the internet."

    The announcement also drew criticism from libertarians such as Berin Szoka of TechFreedom. "This entire enterprise of prophylactic regulation is a mistake," Szoka argued. He prefers using existing laws, including antitrust and consumer protection, to intervene in cases of ISP misconduct.

    The rules are still under development, and would need to be approved by a majority of the FCC's five commissioners. But Chairman Wheeler is one of three Democrats on the committee, so he has a good chance of getting his proposal approved.

  11. Card 11 of 17

    Does Chairman Wheeler's new proposal mean the end of network neutrality?

  12. Card 12 of 17

    Has network neutrality been violated in the past?

  13. Card 13 of 17

    Netflix has been forced to cut private deals with ISPs. Is that undermining net neutrality?

  14. Card 14 of 17

    How does net neutrality apply to cellular networks?

  15. Card 15 of 17

    What are the alternatives to network neutrality regulation?

  16. Card 16 of 17

    You didn't answer my question!

  17. Card 17 of 17

    How have these cards changed?

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